Tuesday, March 11, 2008

All you ever wanted to know about US energy

This is a very cool site for learning about the production, transport and consumption of enery in the US.

9 comments:

MGraham said...

It does give you an idea of where the energy is coming from and what kind is used by state. Polution can also be determined from this. What I find interesting is that California which has large polution problems, has several differen sources of energy.

Ross Davidson said...

I was surprised to see that North Carolina is both one of the highest electricity users, and among the highest in nuclear energy production. I also did not know that Wyoming was such a huge coal state.

Adam Flora said...

I thought it was interesting that North Carolina has 3 nuclear plants which produces half the electricity that the state's 17 coal fired plants produce. I would like to see the ratio of CO2 produced from the coal plants verus the nuclear plants.

Kiersten Weissinger said...

The extent of California's oil production capabilities is surprising to me, especially considering that they often take the lead where the nation's environment is concerned.

Ian Cronogue said...

I think it's amazing to see how if you look at the map it looks like there is a fair amount of renewable energy producers, including hydro, scattered throughout the country. However, even with all those the renewables still only compose a miniscule fraction of what the country uses. It just shows how much more energy is produced from fossil fules vs all other forms

Tearpock said...

http://www.snopes.com/politics/bush/house.asp

Environmentally efficient housing..
Gore vs. Bush

chris mobley said...

I was unaware until i read this article that our state is among the highest in nuclear energy production and also in electricity consumption. I also found it interesting that in NC we currently have 3 functioning nuclear plants and another interesting fact was the huge amount of coal in Wyoming. With a carbon tax, and a way to burn it and capture the co2, then have a market to sell it, the difference would be immense.

jonathan ziemba said...

i also agree that if 3 nuclear plants can provide energy for half the state, and 17 coal plants produce the rest is an astonishing number. I think the coal plants would produce much more CO2 than a nuclear plant. I know nuclear can be dangerous but it is cleaner. I would like to see some of these alternative energy's on the map grow larger and replace the traditional methods.

lauren fields said...

fossil fuels are our number one energy priority. even though we may have dappled in alternative energy projects across the nation, we have not truly invested in them and are a long way off from relying on them. i think one of hte most difficult things for our nation to overcome will be the transformation of our infrastructure that has been so completely modelled around the use of oil.